Publication
Vocational education and training in Slovenia
Publication Date: 06 Oct 2021
Source: International organizations-CEDEFOP

This short description contributes to better understanding of vocational education and training (VET) in Slovenia. It provides insights into its main features and highlights system developments and current challenges.

Slovenia has a strong VET tradition; participation at upper secondary level is the highest in the EU. The VET system in Slovenia is attractive, flexible and offers a variety of learning modes and progression opportunities for learners; the share of early leavers is kept low. The importance of raising adult skills levels is growing, as is the need to focus on strengthening digital skills and broadening opportunities for upskilling and reskilling.

Slovenia is responding to challenges, including those posed by the COVID-19 pandemic, with a focus on modernising vocational education. Its basic goal is adapting education to the digital and sustainable transition and increasing the resilience of the education system.

Document
The digitization of TVET and skills systems
Publication Date: 21 Aug 2020
Source: ILO, International organizations
This joint ILO-UNESCO report provides a global, high-level overview of how digitalization is affecting TVET and skills systems. It draws on consultations with key stakeholders in a set of countries and international organizations to provide insights into the nature and scope of digitalisation and how it is likely to affect the management, delivery, assessment and certification of technical and vocational education and training. The study draws on developments in Brazil, Ghana, India, Kenya, Malaysia, Malta, Mauritius, New Zealand, Slovenia, Turkey and the United States.
Document
A routine transition? Causes and consequences of the changing content of jobs in Central and Eastern Europe
Publication Date: 13 Jul 2016
Source: Academic institutions, Other sources
This paper studies the shift from manual to cognitive work in 10 economies of Central and Eastern Europe. It highlights the growth in the non-routine cognitive component of jobs, but pay particular attention to the increase in routine cognitive tasks, a trend that is pronounced in the CEE economies but absent in the most advanced economies. It shows that workforce upgrading and structural change were the main factors behind the increase in all cognitive tasks, but that the growth in routine cognitive tasks is partly attributable to rising shares of routine-intensive occupations. It identifies two groups of workers whose jobs depend most on performing routine cognitive tasks: middle-skilled men in the manufacturing sectors and middle-skilled women in the service sectors, who jointly represent 33% of workers in CEE. It finds that robust employment and wage growth among routine cognitive workers has so far prevented job polarisation in CEE. However, the relative prices of routine cognitive tasks are already higher than those of other tasks. If the prices of routine cognitive tasks rise further while technological progress continues, routine intensive employment may gradually decline. It concludes with policy implications of the findings.
Document
Monitoring ECVET implementation strategies in Europe in 2013
Publication Date: 18 Mar 2014
Source: Other sources
The aim of the European credit system for vocational education and training (ECVET) is to allow individuals to gain a full vocational education and training (VET) qualification, or to update/upgrade their VET qualifications in a flexible way, by use of credits.

ECVET requires qualifications to be described in terms of learning outcomes that will be then defined as units that might translate into credits. Learning outcomes recognised in form of credits may be transferred between education and training institutions, whether in the same country or abroad, and accumulated towards achieving a full or a partial qualification. If the VET system allows it, learning acquired in non-formal and informal settings may be assessed and validated as credits to be used for transfer and accumulation purposes. In this context, ECVET is more likely to reach its full potential if linked to the European qualifications framework (EQF)/national qualifications framework (NQF) developments that support the description of qualifications in terms of learning outcomes, as well as with national arrangements and practices for validating non-formal and informal learning.

This report covers ECVET developments in 38 countries and regions up to September 2013; it is the fourth since 2010, when Cedefop started its regular ECVET analysis in relation to national VET reforms. The deadlines of the ECVET recommendation set 2013 as the year for ECVET’s gradual application to VET qualifications at all levels of the EQF, following more than three years of testing and development.