Publication
Centres of vocational excellence: Autonomy in forging public-private partnerships in vocational education and skills development
Publication Date: 07 Sep 2021
Source: International organizations-ETF
This study explores how the centres of vocational excellence (CoVEs) implement their autonomous role in public-private partnerships (PPPs), and the specific features and benefits of CoVEs’ collaborations in PPPs for vocational education and skills development. Drawing on selected case studies in six ETF partner countries (Azerbaijan, Georgia, Israel, Morocco, Tunisia and Turkey) and two EU Member States (Finland and the Netherlands), the study provides insights into CoVE developmental processes and practices in PPPs and shows emerging trends that can inform vocational education policy development more widely.
Document
Ageing and Employment Policies: Netherlands 2014
Publication Date: 29 May 2017
Source: International organizations
Given the ageing challenges, there is an increasing pressure in OECD countries to further boost the employability of the working-age population over the coming decades. This report provides an overview of policy iniatives implemented over the past decade in the Netherlands and identifies areas where more should be done, covering both supply-side and demand-side aspects. To give better incentives to carry on working, the report recommends to promote longer contribution periods in the second-pillar pension schemes, and ensure better information and transparency of pension schemes, with a special focus on groups with low financial literacy. On the side of employers, it is important to progress towards more age-neutral hiring decisions and wage-setting procedures with more focus on performance and less on tenure and seniority. To improve the employability of older workers, the focus should be to promote training measures for older unemployed which are directly linked to a specific job. The large diversity in municipal "Work-First"programmes should be utilised in designing mor effective activation policies targetted on those at risk of losing contact with the labour market.

DOI:10.1787/9789264208155-en
Document
Boosting skills for all in the Netherlands
Publication Date: 07 Jul 2016
Source: International organizations
Strong and adequate skills are essential to support workers’ productivity and to ensure robust employment outcomes. Developing workers’ skills would also increase their personal satisfaction and wages, contributing in making growth more inclusive. The Netherlands performs well in terms of competences of a large part of the population. Moreover, the country has been successful in adjusting the required level of skills over time. The education system plays a key role in developing skills and achieves good results, but there is room to make vocational education and lifelong learning less job-specific to better adapt to new economic trends. There is scope to use more effectively existing skills at work of youth entering the labour market and entrepreneurs, and to reduce labour market mismatches. Another challenge is to help some people to acquire skills by facilitating their labour market integration – in particular first- and second-generation immigrants, long-term unemployed, and people with low educational attainment and health problems -, which requires stronger targeted active labour market policies. This paper presents an analysis of current and future skills trends in the Netherlands.

DOI: 10.1787/5jlwjg6j6lr1-en
Document
The role of employers in sectoral skills development: International approaches
Publication Date: 31 Mar 2016
Source: Academic institutions
This paper considers models of employer engagement within different international approaches to sectoral skills development, focusing on examples from the UK, New Zealand, South Africa, Hong Kong, Singapore, the Netherlands and the USA. Four sectoral models of employer engagement are outlined, exploring what is expected from employers within these different models. Some of the challenges and implications of these different sectoral approaches to engaging employers and creating demand-led skills systems are discussed.