Generic document
Brief: Digital technologies and how India can use it to its advantage
Publication Date: 20 Apr 2022
Source: ILO
The development of information and communication technologies (ICTs) since the mid-1980s was believed to offer a new ‘development paradigm’ for developing countries such as India to create new markets and employment opportunities in knowledge-intensive services. India embarked on an ambitious effort to integrate ICT development into its national policies and seized this opportunity and developed a range of IT-enabled services from software and R&D services at one end of the skill spectrum to business processes such as call centres at the other end.

With the on-going digital transformations in the economy, this repository of skills and knowledge could be harnessed and utilised effectively to bring about a productive transformation of the Indian economy. The development of digital infrastructure serves as an important approach for countries to elevate themselves in the digital value chains, which can be observed in a number of developing countries including India.

ILO’s Brief “Digital technologies and how India can use it to its advantage”, provides insight on building and developing digital infrastructure to address the digital divide; how digital technologies can be used for productive transformation of the society and economy; and how institutions can be strengthened in the digital era.
Project
Skills Innovation Facility
Publication Date: 27 Oct 2021
Source: ILO
 
 

Skills systems are confronted by the need to respond to increasingly dynamic and fluid labour market and societal conditions. Climate change, technology, demographic shifts, migration and globalization are causing increasing disruption to the world of work, while making skills development increasingly complex, fluid and unpredictable. Addressing contemporary skills challenges requires more dynamic and integrated skills and lifelong learning ecosystems.

Recognizing the importance of innovation for the renewed calls for lifelong learning, the ILO has initiated the development of a Skills Innovation Facility. The Facility identifies and tests promising and innovative ideas and solutions that address the major skills challenges of today and of tomorrow.

Project
Mécanisme d’innovation pour les compétences
Publication Date: 27 Oct 2021
Source: ILO
 
 

Les systèmes de compétences sont confrontés à la nécessité de répondre à un marché du travail et à des conditions sociétales de plus en plus dynamiques et évolutifs. Le changement climatique, les technologies, les évolutions démographiques, les migrations et la mondialisation ont une incidence sur le monde du travail, tout en rendant le développement des compétences de plus en plus complexe, évolutifs et imprévisible. Pour relever les défis contemporains en matière de compétences, il est nécessaire de disposer des compétences plus dynamiques et intégrées et des écosystèmes d'apprentissage tout au long de la vie.

Reconnaissant l'importance de l'innovation pour favoriser l'apprentissage tout au long de la vie, l'OIT a lancé le Mécanisme d’innovation pour les compétences. Ce mécanisme permet d'identifier et de tester des idées et des solutions innovantes et prometteuses pour relever les principaux défis d'aujourd'hui et de demain en matière de compétences.

Document
Skills shortages and labour migration in the field of information and communication technology in Canada, China, Germany, India, Indonesia, Singapore and Thailand
Publication Date: 02 Oct 2020
Source: ILO
Digitalization is a key driver of change. As information and communication technology (ICT) continues to advance and digital technologies are further integrated into sectors across our economies, the skills that are needed the most also continue to change and are increasingly in demand. To better understand the implications for the world of work, the ILO’s ‘Future of Work in Information and Communication Technology (ICT)’ project has for the past two-and-a-half years conducted in-depth research on anticipated needs for skilled ICT workers and formulating strategies to address labour shortages, including the scaling up of investments in ICT education and training, and better governed international labour migration.

This report, the last of a series of three reports, summarizes the project’s findings, which were formulated on the basis of research conducted in Canada, China, Germany, India, Indonesia, Singapore and Thailand. It provides an overview of: (a) trends in the ICT sector, ICT labour markets and the migration of ICT workers; (b) the potential demand for skilled workers and current and anticipated skills mismatches in the digital economy; and (c) strategies for improving ICT education and training. Furthermore, it summarizes the key research findings and outlines possible policy responses that could be adopted with a view to scaling up current initiatives to advance decent work opportunities in the digital economy.
Blog
Blog: Overcoming barriers and ensuring equal opportunities: Education, skills & work-based learning for developing employability of girls in India
Date: 04 Nov 2019
Source: Other sources
While the number of girls in India who are able to improve their future prospects and experience economic empowerment is increasing, they still face a number of barriers such as gender differentiations in earnings, career progression and occupational segregation in the transition from education to employment.

According to a 2018 ILO-UNICEF study entitled 'Skills, Education and Training for Girls Now', the global NEET rate, which measures the proportion of youth not in education, employment or training, is twice as high for female than male youth (at 31 and 16 per cent, respectively). In India, the NEET rate is 43 per cent for males and 96 per cent for females. What inhibits the transition of female youth from education to work? What leads younger women to drop out of the workforce, and what prevents them from returning to paid work later on? This blog discusses the barriers that female youth in India face in acquiring education and skills for improving their employability and proposes a set of measures that could help overcome such barriers.

To read the rest of this article, click on the PDF below.
Blog
Blog: Apprenticeships could address most of India’s skill development challenges
Date: 09 Oct 2018
Source: Other sources
The regulatory challenge for apprenticeships

When the Apprentices Act was first conceptualized in 1961, the infant Indian industry was largely manufacturing based under a license-quota regime along with an insignificant service sector. In the initial couple of decades of independence, our industry lacked adequate maturity and hence a prescriptive regime for notification of apprenticeship quota and strict controls may have been crucial.

The original Act was conceived almost six decades ago whereas sweeping changes have taken place in the Indian economy since then. Despite significant growth in the manufacturing sector, the emergence of an even larger service sector and the introduction of several vocational and other relevant courses beyond Industrial Training Institutes (ITIs), India was stagnating with 200,000 to 300,000 apprentices annually. This is a very small proportion of the 10 million people annually who aspire to join our labour force of 510 million workers. As against that, Germany and China have three and 20 million apprentices respectively. Clearly, the scale of apprenticeship in India has been abysmal.

Indian industry had been pleading for an apprenticeship regime that is business-friendly with reduced governmental controls. A process of countrywide consultation with industry was carried out to understand the challenges associated with apprenticeships. This eventually led to the emergence of a consensus that a self-regulated regime would lead to a sharp increase in the number of apprentices voluntarily trained by industry. Reforms propelled by Indian industry coupled with a long-drawn advocacy process and inter-ministerial consultations eventually resulted into amendments to the Apprentices Act passed by Parliament in 2014.

To read the rest of this article, click on the PDF below.