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The Nordic future of work: Drivers, institutions, and politics
Publication Date: 30 May 2019
Source: Other sources
This initial report describes the main drivers and trends expected to shape the future of work. It also reviews the main distinctions of the Nordic model and recent developments in Nordic working lives, pointing towards the kind of challenges the future of work may pose to the Nordic models. Too often, debates about the future narrowly focus on changes in technology. This report draws attention to the broader drivers and political-institutional frameworks influencing working life developments, aiming to spur debate about how the interaction of changes in demography, climate, globalization and digital technologies may influence Nordic working lives in the coming decades.
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Skills for green jobs: 2018 update
Publication Date: 02 May 2019
Source: Other sources
This report provides an update on the state of play regarding ‘green skills’ and ‘green jobs’ in six EU countries (Denmark, Germany, Spain, Estonia, France and the UK). It examines the major changes in green jobs and employment since 2010, and analyses the regulations and policies supporting green skills and employment, including the surrounding institutional set-up and the role played by social partners. It also highlights good practices, including green skill anticipation mechanisms, relevant vocational education and training and higher education, active labour market policies and retraining measures, and the role of the private sector.
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Ageing and Employment Policies: Denmark 2015
Publication Date: 29 May 2017
Source: International organizations
This report provides an overview of policy initiatives implemented in Denmark over the past decade. Even if these recent reforms are well in line with the recommendations of the 2005 OECD report Ageing and Employment Policies: Denmark, the focus has been put mainly on the supply side. The aim of this new report is to identify what more could be done to promote longer working lives. As a first step, the government should assess closely the implementation process to ensure that the expected outcomes of the reforms are achieved. More broadly, the strategy should act simultaneously in three areas by: i) strengthening incentives to carry on working; ii) tackling employment barriers on the side of employers; and iii) improving the employability of older workers.

DOI:10.1787/9789264235335-en
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Cost–benefit analysis of remedial interventions for the long-term unemployed
Publication Date: 25 Aug 2016
Source: Other sources
This study assesses the administrative costs and the cost effectiveness of a limited number of policy intervention options for reintegration of the long term unemployed into the labour market. To this end, research was done for a sample of five European Union Member States which are perceived as being sufficiently diverse in models of service provision and institutional delivery models to allow conclusions to be drawn of relevance to the EU28 countries.